A writer’s challenge to politicians over medical cannabis

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For almost 50 years now I’ve suffered from a debilitating, often crippling and painful condition called Still’s Disease, a form of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis which strikes children. I contracted the disease at 12 years of age. When I search for an image for the condition I imagine “a hard winter of the bones”.

Fifty years of experience with almost every kind of arthritis drug – steroids, gold, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), immunosuppressants, chemotherapy and most recently monoclonal antibodies, as well as many varieties of painkiller ranging from paracetamol to DF118 – has taught me that there are no free lunches. All drugs have side-effects, and some of them are pretty dramatic. One trendy item, for example, gave me a perforated bowel and three weeks on morphine and antibiotics in a London hospital. It almost killed me. Steroids cost me my hips – a side-effect known as steroid necrosis – at 27 years of age. I have more allergies to medication than I like to think about. One of them, Diclofenac, an arthritis drug used to reduce inflammation and relieve pain, causes my throat to close – a potentially fatal response.

By William Wall – Continue Reading…

The Arthritis Society Funds Medical Marijuana Research For Fibromyalgia

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The Arthritis Society recently announced that it will be conducting more research on marijuana’s ability to help treat fibromyalgia. Below is a press release about it. Hopefully the research leads to breakthroughs that help as many people as possible:

The Arthritis Society has announced the winner of its latest research grant for the study of medical cannabis and arthritis. McGill University’s Dr. Mark Ware, who has garnered a worldwide reputation as a leader in pain research, will lead a trial examining the use of oral cannabinoids for fibromyalgia – a disease that inflicts chronic pain on some 520,000 Canadians, most of them women.

The study was selected from among several proposals submitted by Canadian researchers to receive the three-year grant, following an extensive peer review process by an impartial volunteer panel of cross-disciplinary medical and scientific experts as well as arthritis health consumers.

By Johnny Green Continue Reading Here…